New materials, old ideas

The more I look at the way our modern extension is being built, the more I am convinced that it is a fitting companion to the original 16th century oak-framed house. There is not a great deal of difference between the basic structural concepts, and only the materials and methods of fixing are new.

The biggest difference is that an old oak frame is mortised and tenoned rigidly with a few very heavy timbers while a modern softwood frame uses more but lighter timbers fixed with nails and steel hangers, and plywood sheets to increase rigidity. A modern construction can also use some big timbers, eg our glulam roof beam which runs the length of the building.

The timber frame takes shape
The timber frame takes shape
The roof timbers are added, with a Glulam central beam
The roof timbers are added, with a Glulam beam
The panels are infilled with insulation, with plywood panelling behind
The panels are infilled with insulation, with plywood panelling behind

The extension is a conventional modern timber-frame building. First, a wood frame was constructed piece by piece by Terry Booty of Booty Builders and his team, Andrew and Tim, on a low brick base; then they filled the spaces between the timbers with blocks of Celotex insulation, today’s equivalent of the hazel sticks and clay daub that fill in the panels of the old house.

The new timber is treated softwood, Continue reading “New materials, old ideas”

Removing cement render – 2013

…. in preparation for the extension

Repairs on a building this age are never really finished, but there is a list of essential jobs we want to do before starting on the extension, for which we won planning permission in late 2012. The first step is to finish the external repairs to the end of the old building where the extension will be built. This means removing a large amount of cement render. Continue reading “Removing cement render – 2013”